A Year of Birds: September 2022

                                        September 2022 The days are still warm at the beginning of September, and there are plenty of bird sightings along the beaches and marshes. Today, on the way into town, I stopped by a local marsh on the river, and saw a pair of Greater yellow legs there, wading and fishing. Then, on theContinue reading “A Year of Birds: September 2022”

A Year of Birds: August 2022

This has been a very busy month, but I am trying to find time to go birding. The sandhill pair is still hanging out near Misery Bay in the marshes, but I haven’t seen the baby. I hope it is okay, I will check on them to see. While hiking, I saw a young merganserContinue reading “A Year of Birds: August 2022”

A Year of Birds: July

July 2022 The weather is getting warmer now each day, bringing the whine of mosquitoes and the droning buzz of deer flies. The only value I see in these pests that bite whenever I venture outdoors is that they do feed the birds and their fledglings. At a nearby park on the river, I sawContinue reading “A Year of Birds: July”

A Year of Birds: June 2022 (part 2)

The egrets can be seen in the marshes, but are quite shy, and will fly off as soon as they see me. I will keep trying, though. I also saw a sparrow on a log enjoying the sun. I love their markings and songs, which are so cheerful. As I was driving to the storeContinue reading “A Year of Birds: June 2022 (part 2)”

A Year of Birds: June 2022 part 1

The days are finally getting warmer, and there was a heat wave on the first of June: the temperature went above 80 degrees (F)- a miracle! And with the warm weather has come mosquitoes, the bane of Michigan bird watchers. Whenever I go into the marshes, clouds of them appear, and they seem to beContinue reading “A Year of Birds: June 2022 part 1”

A Year of Birds: May 2022

A Year of Birds The first week of May, my friends and I drive back north from North Carolina. There are plenty of birds to see, but we are in a hurry to make the long trip. Finally, we are back home, and to reward ourselves, my friends and I indulge in a quick tripContinue reading “A Year of Birds: May 2022”

A Year of Birds 2022: April

April is starting out very cold, after the warm weekend at the end of March. The chickadees and cardinals still visit the feeder, but once the snow melts from the ground I will stop. I don’t want any bears visiting! On the weekend, I go out to Misery Bay, and the canals nearby. I sawContinue reading “A Year of Birds 2022: April”

A Year of Birds: March 2022

March is certainly coming in “like a lion” here in North Michigan with snowstorms, cold wind, and bitter weather. When temperatures sitting near zero still, it feels as if my hands, feet, nose and even eyes hurt if I am out too long. My visits with the birds when I feed them are short onContinue reading “A Year of Birds: March 2022”

A Year of Birds 2022: February

The deer come to the bird feeder, and try to finish off any seeds left over. I see them each evening at around 4:30 pm. The numbers vary, but with the long, hard cold of winter, they are desperate for food. They are also fairly tame; I can almost walk up to them and petContinue reading “A Year of Birds 2022: February”

A Year of Birds: January 2022

I will be posting photos taken throughout the year in this online journal. This is a bitter, very cold winter even for northern Michigan. I am feeding the Chickadees and Jays daily, and they seem grateful. The chickadees have become quite tame, and will let me near. I am hoping to teach them to feedContinue reading “A Year of Birds: January 2022”

A Year of Birds: October

Now the days are getting cooler at night, and shorter. In the early morning, fog can be seen over Lake Huron in a thick white blanket that rolls towards the shore. I know that the shorter days and tree color changes herald the fall migration of the birds to warmer climates. I can still seeContinue reading “A Year of Birds: October”

A Year of Birds: September

The sandpipers are now in their fall plumage, with the spots starting to disappear on their breasts. I feel a bit sad seeing those, realizing that soon they will migrate. The Canadian Geese are gathering into larger groups, and can be seen “practicing” flying together, honking away, then landing, in preparation for their fall migration.Continue reading “A Year of Birds: September”